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Jun 212017
 

mapThe Sheaf Valley Maths Trail is a short walk starting outside Sheffield City College on Granville Road, along the footpath to Sheffield Station and the steel blade sculpture, behind the station to the steel steps and the amphitheatre, up the hill to the Cholera Monument and then back to college via Clay Wood. Along the way you will answer questions on many different aspects of mathematics. It is suitable for school groups, college students studying Functional Skills, home schoolers and their parents or anyone who would like to have a go!

Download the student booklet here. It is best printed as a booklet.

amphitheatrescaledThere are also a teachers booklet and a powerpoint which I will send to you on request. Email graham@mathswithgraham.org.uk to request these. Please let me know who you are planning to use it with.

Topics touched on on the trail include

Number

Counting

Multiplication

Fractions

Time calculations

Reading a timetable

Calculating journey cost

Speed Distance Time calculations

Shape and Space

Measuring length

Estimating length and weight

Symmetry (Line and Rotational)

3 dimensional shape

Angles

Circle calculations

Volume of a cuboid

Area of irregular shapes

Data Handling

Averages

monument

 

Feel free to adapt the trail by missing out some questions and adding others to make it suitable for your students/pupils.

Split your group into teams of 3 or 4 people. Make sure less able students are paired with more able students. Each team will need a DIY tape measure, a large ball of string, a large protractor, a pencil and a calculator. You need to work out the logistics of ensuring there is someone to help at the various stopping points.

Tell your students to stay together, look after each other and take extra care when crossing roads. If this is a school/college outing you will need to fill in a risk assessment.

 

 

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Penrose Triangle sheffcol_logo

 

May 152013
 

In these days of austerity, benefits are being cut and prices continue to rise. It has never been more important to be careful with your money, as getting into debt can spiral out of control and have dire consequences. A first step in taking control of your finances is to understand what you spend your money on. This sheet will help you work this out. To do it accurately you will need to record your spending carefully for several weeks but you may be able to estimate figures until you have got more accurate information.

Fill the figures in for an average month. So for example if you pay an MOT fee of £54.85 each year this would be recorded as 54.85/12 = £4.57 a month. If you spend £10 at the pub once a week that would be recorded as 4 x £10 = £40.

There is also an on-line version which does the sums for you here.

Jan 262013
 

This sheet from moneyfacts.co.uk  explains all about payslips

Jan 202013
 

Here is a letter from the Coop Bank offering Mrs Givusabob a loan. Can you help her understand it?

Here is a worksheet version.

(MathswithGraham likes the Coop Bank because of their ethical principles, but borrowing from any bank can be very expensive.)

Jan 202013
 

sainsbury's Bank Credit CardDo you understand those letters that come through the door offering you a credit card? Have a go at this exercise to find out more.

Here is a worksheet version.

 

(I have used Sainsbury’s Bank as an example of a typical credit card provider- this exercise does not insinuate that Sainsbury’s Bank is any worse than other credit card providers.)

Jan 042013
 

The Joseph Rowntree Foundation research into the minimum income standards for the UK.  The Minimum Income Standard for the UK shows how much money people need, so that they can buy things that members of the public think that everyone in the UK should be able to afford.

  • Figures are based on public views about a minimum standard that nobody should fall below.
  • It does not show you what you require to meet all your individual needs, and is not suitable for use as a personal budgeting tool.

By entering a few details about your circumstances you can compare your income with the MIS, and see how this is made up. For instance  my children are now all grown up and have left home, so I live with my wife. When I have entered details about my rent/mortgage. gas/electric/water bills etc it tells me the minimum income I require is £23,099. They break this down into how much I need for food, alcohol. council tax, clothing etc. It makes very interesting reading!

minimum income standardThe picture shows the results for a single person.

Go to http://www.minimumincome.org.uk/ and enter your details to see what it suggests for your household.

Try this exercise to find out about a single persons minimum income. It will also help you to calculate percentages.

 

Jan 042013
 

Everybody is feeling the pinch at the moment. Try this interactive  Money Saving Transport Quiz to see if you can save some cash! Here is the same exercise in worksheet format.

Jan 032013
 

Many people living in poverty are being ripped off with massive interest rates. There is an interesting blog article here which explains how people who can’t get bank accounts and are trying to survive on benefits sometimes see no alternative but to use door step lenders or shops that offer instant credit but then charge extortionate interest rates.

Try this quiz to learn more about shopping on credit.

Sep 302012
 

Click here to download this Level 2 Functional Maths worksheet, Don’t always believe what you read in the newspaper.
It concerns how much money you can save by spending less time in the shower.

Feb 062012
 

Do you find it difficult to make ends meet? Are you worried about how you will manage your money in the future? This site will give you plenty of advice and help you with things like budgeting. It’s a site that gives free, unbiased money advice to help you make informed choices – throughout your life and whatever your circumstances.
Why not check it out? Money Advice Service